Rasam Powder

Note: This post contains affiliate links. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Check out this easy recipe for rasam powder – a zesty, aromatic spice blend from South India that makes rasam (a tangy lentil-based soup) taste so darn good.

An overhead shot of Rasam powder in a glass bottle
Rasam powder (podi) recipe

Rasam (meaning juice or essence) is a popular lentil-based soup from South India. It is a delightfully tangy and spicy concoction that is served with rice. While tomatoes and tamarind provide the tang, rasam powder is what gives this dish its spice and flavor.

Rasam powders can make or break the recipe, no kidding. That’s why homemade rasam powders are so popular with rasam connoisseurs. This recipe has been with my family for generations and yields a world-class rasam that you’ll be proud to present to yours.

How to make rasam powder

Preparing rasam powder at home takes very little time and effort. There are a few key ingredients that you’ll find in every rasam podi (powder) recipe such as byadgi chilies, coriander seeds (dhania), black peppercorns, cumin seeds, fenugreek (methi) seeds along with curry leaves, turmeric powder and asafoetida (hing).

The process of making rasam powder itself is very straightforward and has 5 easy steps –

  1. In a pan kept over medium-low heat, add oil and once it heats up, add byadgi chilies and fry them till they are aromatic (approximately 50-60 seconds). Remove the chilies and set them aside on a plate to cool.
  2.  Add fenugreek (methi seeds), fry them for 10 seconds or so before adding coriander seeds, and peppercorns. Fry them till they turn aromatic.
  3. Add cumin seeds and curry leaves. Fry them for another 10-15 seconds and turn off the gas.
  4. Take the pan off the heat and let it cool down for 10 minutes before grinding them to a fine powder along with the byadgi chilies, turmeric powder, and hing.
  5. If the mixture is warm after being ground, transfer it to a plate and once it cools down, transfer the powder to an air-tight container and store it in a cool place. Stores well for 2-3 months.

Note

  1. The color of this spice blend may vary from bright red to deep orange based on the chilies used.
  2. If byadgi chilies are not available, Kashmiri chilies would be a good substitute.
  3. When roasting spices it is recommended that the spice that takes the longest time is roasted first, that’s why this recipe follows a certain sequence. Having said that, if I am making in small batches, I often roast them together like in this picture below.
Roasted Rasam ingredients are placed in a pan
Rasam ingredients, roasted

Rasam podi recipe variations

This rasam powder traces its origin back to Udupi, a vibrant town in Karnataka where rasam is popularly known as saar/saaru. There are many variations to rasam powder or saaru podi recipes across states and of course, households.

You’ll find this Udupi rasam powder recipe very similar to an Andhra rasam powder and the Iyengar rasam powder version. It is a very classic recipe and with a few small tweaks, you can create a lot of variations. For example, keeping all the ingredients and ratios the same from my recipe, make the following changes –

  • For Mysore rasam powder, add 2 tablespoons of mustard seeds and roast it along with coriander seeds.
  • Kerala rasam powder calls for 1/4th cup chana dal and 1/4th cup tuvar dal (pigeon peas) to be roasted along with coriander seeds.
  • To make this recipe Chettinad style, add ½ cup tuvar dal (pigeon peas) and roast it along with coriander seeds.

How to make rasam using rasam powder

This easy and tangy rasam recipe leverages this rasam powder to make this delicious lentil soup that pairs well with rice.

Homemade Indian Spice blends

If you are someone who likes to make their own homemade spice blends, I have a few tried and tested recipes that I am sure you’ll love –

  • Authentic Sambar Powder – This aromatic spice blend transforms ordinary lentil-vegetable dishes into delicious, wholesome stews called sambar that is often served along with rice, idli or dosa.
  • Easy and Fragrant Garam Masala Powder –  Homemade garam masalas are the best – flavorful and potent. Use them for your North Indian curries and biryanis to make it aromatic.
  • Kundapur Masala Powder (Taal powder) – This spice blend will help you cut your cooking time for most Mangalorean dishes substantially – that’s why most folks stock it at home.
  • Taco seasoning – Skip the storebought jars and learn how to make your own Mexican spice blend in less than 5 minutes!

You don’t need a traditional Indian blender to make rasam powder – a high-performance blender like Blendtec does the job just fine.

Rasam podi (saaru podi) ground using blender
Udupi Rasam Powder made in Blendtec


Got a new Instant Pot? Check out the links below to make the most of your pressure cooker -  
An overhead shot of Rasam powder in a glass bottle

Rasam Powder Recipe

4.63 from 8 votes
Check out this easy recipe for rasam powder - a zesty, aromatic spice blend that makes rasam tastes so darn good.  
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 5 minutes
Resting time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 20 minutes
Servings: 16 tablespoons
Diet : Vegan
Course : Basics
Method: Blender, Stovetop
Cuisine : Indian

Ingredients
 
 

To fry

Remaining ingredients

Instructions
 

  • In a pan kept over medium-low heat, add oil and once it heats up, add byadgi chilies and fry them till they are aromatic (approximately 50-60 seconds). Remove the chilies and set them aside on a plate to cool.
  • Add fenugreek (methi seeds), fry them for 10 seconds or so before adding coriander seeds, and peppercorns. Fry them till they turn aromatic.
  • Add cumin seeds and curry leaves. Fry them for another 10-15 seconds and turn off the gas.
  • Take the pan off the heat and let it cool down for 10 minutes before grinding them to a fine powder along with the byadgi chilies, turmeric powder, and hing.
  • If the mixture is warm after being ground, transfer it to a plate and once it cools down, transfer the powder to an air-tight container and store it in a cool place. Stores well for 2-3 months.

Notes

Note
  1. When roasting spices it is recommended that the spice that takes the longest time is roasted first, that's why this recipe follows a certain sequence. Having said that, if I am making in small batches, I often roast them together.
  2. The color of this spice blend may vary from bright red to deep orange based on the chilies used. 
  3. If byadgi chilies are not available, Kashmiri chilies would be a good substitute.
Rasam podi recipe variations
This rasam powder traces its origin back to Udupi, a vibrant town in Karnataka where rasam is popularly known as saar / saaru. There are many variations to rasam powder recipes across states and of course, households.
You’ll find this Udupi rasam powder recipe very similar to an Andhra rasam powder and the Iyengar rasam powder version. It is a very classic recipe and with a few small tweaks, you can create a lot of variations. For example, keeping all the ingredients and ratios the same from my recipe, make the following changes -
  • For Mysore rasam powder, add 2 tablespoons of mustard seeds and roast it along with coriander seeds.
  • Kerala rasam powder calls for 1/4th cup chana dal and 1/4th cup tuvar dal (pigeon peas) to be roasted along with coriander seeds.
  • To make this recipe Chettinad style, add ½ cup tuvar dal (pigeon peas) and roast it along with coriander seeds.

Pantry EssentialsGetting the right tools for your kitchen makes cooking more enjoyable and less frustrating. Here's a list of kitchen essentials I own and recommend.

Disclosure: This recipe contains affiliate links to products we love and recommend. As an affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

Nutrition

Serving: 1gCalories: 35kcalCarbohydrates: 6gProtein: 1gFat: 1gSaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 6mgPotassium: 179mgFiber: 3gSugar: 2gVitamin A: 304IUVitamin C: 54mgCalcium: 53mgIron: 2mg

Disclaimer: Approximate Nutritional information is provided as a courtesy and can vary depending on the exact ingredients/brands used. If you have health issues, please work with a registered dietician or nutritionist.

Did you make this recipe?Take a photo and tag @simmertoslimmer on Instagram for a shoutout!
Keyword : homemade, Saaru podi, Udupi style

Get dinner on the table faster!

Learn my meal planning + prepping secrets to make fresh Indian food without spending hours in the kitchen.

An overhead shot of Gujarathi kadhi along with rice, rotis and a side of lemon

FREE EMAIL COURSE

Simmer to Slimmer Logo

3 Comments

  1. I live abroad and buy all the spices in powder form .. from the Indian grocery store and Mexican Mercado for different strengths of the chili 🌶 using tablespoons of each of the recipe mix in a glass bowl adding turmeric crushed dried curry leaves sauté this on nonstick pan for two minutes do all that all rawness disappears . Store in a glass jar stays fresh for one month .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Recipe Rating